Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

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Volkonski
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#26

Post by Volkonski » Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:44 am

Meanwhile on Long Island-

1.1 Million Doses Of Fentanyl Seized From Home; Trio Arrested

https://patch.com/new-york/northfork/s/ ... aign=alert
Customs officials intercepted two postal packages from Hong Kong destined for a residence in Mastic Beach and on Friday around 4 p.m., a search warrant was executed at 30 Edwards Road where authorities seized about 725 grams of fentanyl, $7,400 cash, numerous 9mm rounds two cellphones and a 2007 Mercedes-Benz.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
― Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace

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AndyinPA
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Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#27

Post by AndyinPA » Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:22 am

RVInit wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 9:54 am
There are many aspects to whether or not a person gets addicted when they are prescribed opioids for a legitimate severe pain condition. One issue I think that can't be ignored is whether a person has a tendency for addiction in general. Also, most doctors who are not pain management doctors don't necessarily have the experience to prescribe the proper drug for the type of pain, and the proper amount. Prescribing more than what is necessary is common in situations where the pain is not chronic, i.e. the person will only be using the medication for a limited amount of time. If a person is prescribed a strength and amount of medication that is more than necessary to get pain under control, they will get high from it. That would put a person at risk for getting addicted.

Most people who haven't given birth will live their entire lives without ever experiencing severe pain. Even those who give birth typically experience that severe pain for a limited amount of time, i.e. it doesn't become a chronic pain that won't go away. These are situations where it isn't as likely for a prescription opioid to become an addiction problem, because it's for a limited amount of time. Unless the person is a very addictive personality and the pain medication is far enough above what the person needs that they are getting high from it.

A person who has a legitimate severe pain condition who is getting treatment from an ethical pain management doctor would not be getting an amount of pain medication that will make them pain free, for a number of reasons, one being that inevitably this would create a situation where it would take increasingly larger amounts of the medication to continue allowing the person to be pain free. A person with chronic severe pain under treatment from an ethical pain management doctor will typically only get enough of the medication to bring their pain to a level where they can still have a decent quality of life, but will typically have to adjust activity and use additional methods and/or additional non-opioid medications to help keep this kind of pain under control.

I am all for any efforts to help people who really are addicted and also to get pill mill type of doctors out of business. But there is a population of people who really do have severe chronic pain that is not their fault, are not abusing any medications, are not addicted, and are not requiring increasing amounts of medications, and it is imperative that whatever efforts are made to reduce the problem of opioid addiction, that people who have a legitimate need for these medications be able to continue having access to using, not abusing, those medications, because for those people it is the difference between being able to cope and live, in spite of having a very difficult row to hoe and having a life that is not worth living.
There is nothing here I disagree with. It's a really good summary of a lot of the complicated issues surrounding the use of opiod drugs.

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There are many people who need opiod pain management, and whether short term or long term, people who need it should have access to doctors who understand the use and misuse of those drugs and a quality medical system to provide what they need. We also need to find a way to help people who are addicted and help them, not punish them.



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Chilidog
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#28

Post by Chilidog » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:21 pm

MN-Skeptic wrote:
Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:42 pm
Per my city's website -
Take-back programs are the best way to dispose of old drugs. If you can not attend a drug take-back programs,

Take the medications out of their bottles
Mix them with something unappealing such as used kitty litter or coffee grounds
Seal them in a bag or disposable container and throw that away
it still winds up in the water table that way.



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Slartibartfast
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#29

Post by Slartibartfast » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:43 pm

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"Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory. Tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat."
---Sun Tzu (quoting Thomas Jefferson)
nam-myoho-renge-kyo---Thomas Jefferson (quoting Slartibartfast)

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RVInit
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#30

Post by RVInit » Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:42 pm

It is a difficult problem. And requires more than a simple-minded solution, which is, I am afraid the only thing we will get from this administration.

"Who knew drug addiction was such a difficult problem!"

Basically, that is about all that can be said about the current inhabitant of the White House.

"Who knew ____________ would be so hard!"


"I know that human being and fish can coexist peacefully"
--- George W Bush

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Azastan
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#31

Post by Azastan » Sun Oct 29, 2017 1:44 pm

Many years ago, as I was trying to solve the mystery of the horrendous headaches I would get on a regular basis (couple of times a week, for years), I went into the local hospital, as usual, for a shot of dilaudid. The doctor informed me that I was getting just a little too regular with my coming in for the pain, and told me that I would not get any more demerol until I went to see a neurologist.

The neurologist recommended that I have a CAT scan, because I might have a brain tumour. I went in and got prepped for the scan, which included being given an injection of iodine. The nurse belatedly asked me if I was allergic to anything. I'd never mentioned before that I am allergic to shellfish when answering the 'are you allergic to any medication', because I never thought about shellfish being 'medication'. But that day I told her that I was not allergic to any medication, but I was allergic to shellfish. She blanched, and immediately went to get me a shot of, yes, you guessed correctly, demerol.

When being given a shot of demerol for the migraines (since that's what the horrendous headaches were), I never experienced anything except for an urgent need to just go to sleep.

Let me tell you, getting demerol when not having a migraine was AWESOME. I felt GREAT. I could understand how people could get addicted to the stuff. But that wasn't why I needed demerol.

At any rate, I am not an addictive personality except for when it comes to horses. Also, I don't handle opiods very well, as I get rebound migraines from taking them. A prescription for 20 tablets of oxycodone, prescribed for me when I had my appendix out almost a year ago, still has 10 tablets left.



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Volkonski
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Re: Opioid Addiction and Pain Management

#32

Post by Volkonski » Wed Jan 10, 2018 4:13 pm


NBC News‏
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Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf declares disaster emergency for opioid crisis http://nbcnews.to/2mftOtC via @NBCPhiladelphia
With opioids killing more people than any other health crisis in Pennsylvania's modern history, Gov. Tom Wolf on Wednesday declared a disaster emergency that suspends regulations hindering access to addiction care.
It's the first time a disaster emergency has been declared for a public health crisis in the commonwealth. Usually, disaster emergencies are reserved for major weather events such as a hurricane or for a terrorist attack.
"I don't take this action lightly. We know that this crisis has taken far too many lives. It has broken far too many families. It has decimated far too many communities and it has gone on for far too long," Wolf said at an event formally announcing the declaration at the State Capitol in Harrisburg.
The move eases some regulations that have been barriers to help for the addicted and their families. It will expire in 90 days as required by the state Constitution.


Image“If everyone fought for their own convictions there would be no war.”
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