Eclipse

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Foggy
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Re: Eclipse

#201

Post by Foggy » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:18 am

Nightmare traffic on the way home, didn't get here until 10:30. But my son thought it was well worth it, and I agree.

We watched with a crowd of more than 200 people, and there were thousands in the Santee National Wildlife Refuge.

The crowd gave the show a few standing Os. The Moon was like, :thankyou:

Gotta take him to school, come home and get more sleep. Photos later.


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Re: Eclipse

#202

Post by ObjectiveDoubter » Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Ugh! So late to the game, here. I tried to post yesterday, hit "Submit" and it didn't go, I guess.

We spent the duration of the eclipse in a cemetery outside Lincoln City OR. After three bright and sunny mornings, we awoke to a socked in beach.

Image

What to do, what to do? At 8 am, we decided to leave and search for the sun, rather than stick it out and hope that the clouds surrounding us would lift. We drove up Hwy 99, looking for a road east that seemed reasonable enough to expect it would go far enough inland to be sunny. Feeling desperate, and following some other cars that looked smarter than we are (whatever that means), we turned in on Route 18, heavily forested, and headed east. After a few miles deep in greenery, we came to a very wide and inviting drive of the cemetery, on the outskirts of the small town of Otis. The sign read, "Pacific Memorial, Affordable Cremation and Burial." And it was drenched in sun.

We pulled in and found about 100 people scattered around the 10 acres or so. Plaques rather than headstones made it particularly inviting, more like a welcoming picnic area or park than a resting place for those with limited funds. We looked around and there seem to be several serious eclipse chasers with fancy cameras, telescopes and even drones. There were others with comfortable beach chairs, blankets and refreshments. And lots of friendly dogs. Phew! We weren't going to miss a thing and we'd be with a great crowd. Many of whom we found were there as serendipitously as were we, having also just come from the foggy Oregon Coast in search of the sun!

I'll never be able to express the pure unmitigated awe of what we saw. The wonder of nature seen with strangers we'd never see again, but with whom we will always share the memory of it all. Here's my cell phone picture -- nothing fancy, so the sun seems bright -- as it turned dark!

Image



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Reality Check
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Re: Eclipse

#203

Post by Reality Check » Tue Aug 22, 2017 2:27 pm

The new improved Photobucket strikes again.


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mighty dawg
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Re: Eclipse

#204

Post by mighty dawg » Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:57 pm

ObjectiveDoubter wrote:I'll never be able to express the pure unmitigated awe of what we saw. The wonder of nature seen with strangers we'd never see again, but with whom we will always share the memory of it all. Here's my cell phone picture -- nothing fancy, so the sun seems bright -- as it turned dark!
I have seen partial eclipses before, but never a total eclipse. I had not quite realized how significant the difference between the two truly is. "Unmitigated awe" best describes the experience. I felt as if the heavens were looking at me.


"A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be" - Albert Einstein

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HeatherGray
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Re: Eclipse

#205

Post by HeatherGray » Tue Aug 22, 2017 5:44 pm

mighty dawg wrote:
ObjectiveDoubter wrote:I'll never be able to express the pure unmitigated awe of what we saw. The wonder of nature seen with strangers we'd never see again, but with whom we will always share the memory of it all. Here's my cell phone picture -- nothing fancy, so the sun seems bright -- as it turned dark!
I have seen partial eclipses before, but never a total eclipse. I had not quite realized how significant the difference between the two truly is. "Unmitigated awe" best describes the experience. I felt as if the heavens were looking at me.
We left our dogs with two separate friends and headed to Alliance Nebraska. One of the friends couldn't believe we had driven four hours to see totality. Hey, it looked great on TV, she said. I just thought to myself, "You have no idea." It looked as though a hole had opened in the sky. We had two and a half minutes of totality, and it seemed to pass in a few seconds.

It took us seven hours to get home: a distance of about 300 miles. It took four hours to get from Alliance to the NE-CO border, and the rest of the drive was Interstate driving in heavy traffic. We heard from other friends who watched totality in Glendo in Wyoming. It took them ten hours to drive back from Glendo to Cheyenne, a distance of about 102 miles.

And that's another item off the bucket list.



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Re: Eclipse

#206

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:21 pm

Status Report from Columbia, Missouri:

We drove 7 hours from our home to my nephew's home in Columbia, MO, on Sunday. My brother and his wife were there also to enjoy their three granddaughters, oh, and the eclipse. We had grilled Kansas City strip steaks on Sunday evening. YUM!

The girls, ages 10-7-5, were excited about the eclipse. We watched it alternately from their deck or the front of their house. Convenient! It was partly cloudy during the first part of the eclipse enough that the light was dispersed and you couldn't use any Ritz Crackers or colanders for viewing on a sheet of white paper. The temperature drop was distinct in muggy Missouri. We didn't see any shadow bands on the grounds. The girls started counting down once the "diamond ring" appeared. We were unable to see the Bailey's Beads because the sun was positioned so high in the sky.

Once the sun was fully eclipsed, the cicadas started chirping (shrieking? singing?) and the street lights turned on. We saw "sunsets" 360 degrees. It looked like early to mid twilight, not total darkness. We didn't see any stars or planets.

My sister-in-law was moved to tears by it. The girls were thrilled. We all thought it was a great show. Two thumbs up! Fine family fun!

It was better in the second act because the clouds were gone and the contrast was brighter. My nephew called it the "Crescent Sun". He and his family are Muslim. (He converted. He is red headed and blue eyed.)

We have plans for Little Rock in 2024. The girls calculated their ages in 2024. I choose not to reveal mine out of respect for Foggy who will be the same age.

We immediately drove home. The only traffic problem was for about 15 minutes due to a fender bender.

Well worth it!


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Kendra
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Re: Eclipse

#207

Post by Kendra » Wed Aug 23, 2017 7:57 am

http://www.oregonlive.com/eclipse/2017/ ... conic.html
A photographer traveling cross-country in a van captured what may be the most iconic and viral image of 2017's total solar eclipse in a carefully choreographed effort that left no margin for error.

Ted Hesser, a 31-year-old freelance photographer from the Bay Area, scouted locations at Smith Rock State Park in Central Oregon with his girlfriend, Martina Tibell, for a week. The two rock climbing enthusiasts spent days trying different climbing routes alongside other adventure photographers who all descended on the park looking for the perfect angle during totality.



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Re: Eclipse

#208

Post by Mr. Gneiss » Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:04 pm

Photos taken through my Wild Heerbrugg T-2 theodolite with diagonal eyepiece.

The first is of the partial eclipse using a Wild Roelofs Solar Prism. The prism created an interference pattern from four overlapping images of the Sun. It is used by surveyors to accurately point the instrument at the center of the Sun for solar observations. Sorry for all the spots. It has been a while since I use the diagonal eyepiece and it appears to have some mold or fungal growth.
Roelofs.jpg
This photo is taken through the same instrument without any solar filter at the total eclipse using an iPhone. The cross hairs in my theodolite are barely visible.
Alliance_Eclipse.jpg
This is a photo of my wife and the two survey instruments I set up. They were a big hit with the kids in the cul-de-sac. Photos were taken in Alliance, NE.
theo.jpg
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Re: Eclipse

#209

Post by Mr. Gneiss » Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:13 pm

Here is a photo taken by someone that has the proper equipment, experience and artistry. This is similar to what I saw.
Image

From the http://www.spaceweather.com web site, here is more info on Mark Rosengarten's Eclipse Photo

And here is a gallery of photos of the eclipse. Solar Eclipse Photo Gallery



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AndyinPA
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Re: Eclipse

#210

Post by AndyinPA » Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:28 pm

That's majestic in the truest sense of the word!

:worship:



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Reality Check
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Re: Eclipse

#211

Post by Reality Check » Thu Aug 24, 2017 7:34 pm

The most stupid statement I heard was from a lady on the Weather Channel who claimed that atheists have been known to convert to Christianity after viewing an eclipse. There is so much irony there. It is because of science we know to the second and to within a few feet when and where total eclipses will occur. Religion doesn't predict crap.


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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Eclipse

#212

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:08 pm

There is the nice fact that the moon is just the right size to cover the disk of the sun when viewed from earth. To some people that's the sign of a Guiding Hand.

In my view it's just good planning. :mrgreen:



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GreatGrey
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Re: Eclipse

#213

Post by GreatGrey » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:19 pm

Sterngard Friegen wrote:There is the nice fact that the moon is just the right size to cover the disk of the sun when viewed from earth. To some people that's the sign of a Guiding Hand.

In my view it's just good planning. :mrgreen:
Yeabutttt.....

The moon is slowly getting farther away from the Earth. There will be a time (next Thursday?) when it won't be able to totally eclipse the Sun.


I am not "someone upthread".
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Re: Eclipse

#214

Post by maydijo » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:23 pm

I don't put much stock in intelligent design. Look at the platypus. There's not much that is intelligent in that design. Don't get me wrong, I love platypi, they're one of my favourite monotremes. But nothing about that animal makes sense.



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Re: Eclipse

#215

Post by pipistrelle » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:33 pm

maydijo wrote:I don't put much stock in intelligent design. Look at the platypus. There's not much that is intelligent in that design. Don't get me wrong, I love platypi, they're one of my favourite monotremes. But nothing about that animal makes sense.
It makes sense to the platypus.



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Re: Eclipse

#216

Post by maydijo » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:35 pm

pipistrelle wrote:
maydijo wrote:I don't put much stock in intelligent design. Look at the platypus. There's not much that is intelligent in that design. Don't get me wrong, I love platypi, they're one of my favourite monotremes. But nothing about that animal makes sense.
It makes sense to the platypus.
I'm waiting to hear it from a Platypus's mouth. Err, beak. Snout?



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Re: Eclipse

#217

Post by pipistrelle » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:37 pm

maydijo wrote:
pipistrelle wrote:
maydijo wrote:I don't put much stock in intelligent design. Look at the platypus. There's not much that is intelligent in that design. Don't get me wrong, I love platypi, they're one of my favourite monotremes. But nothing about that animal makes sense.
It makes sense to the platypus.
I'm waiting to hear it from a Platypus's mouth. Err, beak. Snout?
I think it's called a bill.



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Re: Eclipse

#218

Post by kate520 » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:38 pm

Duck billed platypus. Yup, with poison spurs. Giddyup!


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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Eclipse

#219

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:38 pm

GreatGrey wrote:
Sterngard Friegen wrote:There is the nice fact that the moon is just the right size to cover the disk of the sun when viewed from earth. To some people that's the sign of a Guiding Hand.

In my view it's just good planning. :mrgreen:
Yeabutttt.....

The moon is slowly getting farther away from the Earth. There will be a time (next Thursday?) when it won't be able to totally eclipse the Sun.
1.5 inches a year. But I'm expecting the turtles and elephants to move a squidge to maintain complete obscuration.



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Re: Eclipse

#220

Post by maydijo » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:43 pm

Animals evolve only until they don't have to evolve any longer to fit into their environment. So, kangaroos, having evolved without any natural predators, are inordinately unable to respond to dangerous situations. Platypi and echindnas still lay eggs, although no other mammals do, because it works for their environment. But it's not necessarily intelligent. Indeed you could argue it's not intelligent, because all other mammals have evolved to live birth. My point is, people who argue it's "intelligent design" aren't paying attention to the world. They're happy saying, "Wow! God!" I think you can make the same argument about fields other than biology. Why is the moon the perfect size when seen from earth to cover up the sun? I'm sure there's a very good scientific argument for it, probably having to do with it's the perfect size to rotate around the earth without affecting the gravitational pull, or something like that. To just say, "Wow! God!" is to miss out on half the fun.



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Re: Eclipse

#221

Post by RoadScholar » Thu Aug 24, 2017 8:51 pm

The sum total of my entertaining a supernatural dimension is this:

The universe is suspiciously groovy.

Yes, the moon was closer and will be farther. But right now, in the-- what-- 8 billion years the earth will be around, the first time a species capable of comprehending eclipses comes along, the moon is just the right size. Or distance rather.

Coincidence? Sure, probably. But it just seems suspiciously groovy. Lots of other stuff does too.


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Sterngard Friegen
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Re: Eclipse

#222

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:00 pm

RoadScholar wrote:The sum total of my entertaining a supernatural dimension is this:

The universe is suspiciously groovy.

Yes, the moon was closer and will be farther. But right now, in the-- what-- 8 billion years the earth will be around, the first time a species capable of comprehending eclipses comes along, the moon is just the right size. Or distance rather.

Coincidence? Sure, probably. But it just seems suspiciously groovy. Lots of other stuff does too.
"God does not play dice. But he's groovy." - Albert Einstein



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Re: Eclipse

#223

Post by Dan1100 » Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:03 pm

RoadScholar wrote:The sum total of my entertaining a supernatural dimension is this:

The universe is suspiciously groovy.

Yes, the moon was closer and will be farther. But right now, in the-- what-- 8 billion years the earth will be around, the first time a species capable of comprehending eclipses comes along, the moon is just the right size. Or distance rather.

Coincidence? Sure, probably. But it just seems suspiciously groovy. Lots of other stuff does too.
The moon isn't always the right size/distance to cover the sun, that's why there are annular eclipses.


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Re: Eclipse

#224

Post by Reality Check » Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:42 pm

The moons orbit is moot. By the time the moons orbit has enlarged enough that no total eclipses can occur mankind will either have
  1. evolved to the point that it can use technological means to actively alter the orbit of the moon back into the "eclipse zone" or
  2. mankind will have destroyed itself.
After the last election I would put the odds on choice 2 at about a billion to one in favor.


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Sam the Centipede
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Re: Eclipse

#225

Post by Sam the Centipede » Thu Aug 24, 2017 11:43 pm

maydijo wrote:Animals evolve only until they don't have to evolve any longer to fit into their environment.
Not quite correct, but your underlying point - that natural selection does not include a predictive element - is spot on.
maydijo wrote:Why is the moon the perfect size when seen from earth to cover up the sun? I'm sure there's a very good scientific argument for it, probably having to do with it's the perfect size to rotate around the earth without affecting the gravitational pull, or something like that. To just say, "Wow! God!" is to miss out on half the fun.
There have been plenty of "what if?" debates about the importance of the presence of our moon in the evolution and maintenance of the Earth as it is. It apparently does have a useful stabilizing effect (iirc) and it makes tides, which are definitely handy for things that live in inter-tidal zones. But exactly covering the Sun in an eclipse is mere happenstance.

As the exquisitely wacky platypus has worked itself into a thread about eclipses, I must protest that its wonderful electric senses have not been mentioned, another feature (with egg-laying, poisonous spurs and generally crayzeeenesss) that make it a zoological delight.

Oh, and do Aussies really say "platypi" as a catachrestic* plural? It should be either "platypuses", which follows the English language's rules for regular formation of plurals, or "platypodes", if one wishes to respect the latinized Greek etymology. "Platypi": :sick:

* yes, I know, quite self-referential, eh?



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