Science, General Stuff

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1051

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Jul 03, 2017 4:03 pm

New Florida law lets any resident challenge what's taught in science classes

Washington Post
Monday, July 3, 2017 10:20am

Any resident in Florida can now challenge what kids learn in public schools, thanks to a new law that science education advocates worry will make it harder to teach evolution and climate change.

The legislation, which was signed by Gov. Rick Scott (R) last week and went into effect Saturday, requires school boards to hire an "unbiased hearing officer" who will handle complaints about instructional materials, such as movies, textbooks and novels, that are used in local schools. Any parent or county resident can file a complaint, regardless of whether they have a student in the school system. If the hearing officer deems the challenge justified, he or she can require schools to remove the material in question.

The statute includes general guidelines about what counts as grounds for removal: belief that the material is "pornographic" or "is not suited to student needs and their ability to comprehend the material presented, or is inappropriate for the grade level and age group."
http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/n ... es/2329141



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1052

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Jul 03, 2017 4:10 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
New Florida law lets any resident challenge what's taught in science classes

Washington Post
Monday, July 3, 2017 10:20am

Any resident in Florida can now challenge what kids learn in public schools, thanks to a new law that science education advocates worry will make it harder to teach evolution and climate change.

The legislation, which was signed by Gov. Rick Scott (R) last week and went into effect Saturday, requires school boards to hire an "unbiased hearing officer" who will handle complaints about instructional materials, such as movies, textbooks and novels, that are used in local schools. Any parent or county resident can file a complaint, regardless of whether they have a student in the school system. If the hearing officer deems the challenge justified, he or she can require schools to remove the material in question.

The statute includes general guidelines about what counts as grounds for removal: belief that the material is "pornographic" or "is not suited to student needs and their ability to comprehend the material presented, or is inappropriate for the grade level and age group."
http://www.tampabay.com/news/politics/n ... es/2329141
Just like "No Child Left Behind" this requirement is probably unfunded.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1053

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Jul 23, 2017 1:15 pm

Was :sterngard:s childhood pet discovered?
Boy Face-Plants Right Onto a Million-Year-Old Stegomastodon Skull

By Jeanna Bryner, Live Science Managing Editor | July 20, 2017 01:09pm ET

A 9-year-old boy hiking in the Las Cruces desert in New Mexico recently tripped over what is now thought to be a 1.2-million-year-old Stegomastodon skull.

"I was running farther up, and I tripped on part of the tusk," Jude Sparks, now 10, who was hiking in the desert with his parents and brothers, said in a statement from New Mexico State University (NMSU). "My face landed next to the bottom jaw. I looked farther up, and there was another tusk."

A prehistoric ancestor of mammoths and elephants, Stegomastodon belongs to the scientific family Gomphotheriidae. While many gomphotheres sported four tusks — an upper pair that curved downward and outward, and a lower pair that were sort of spatula-shaped — Stegomastodon had just two upward-curving tusks, sometimes called chin tusks, that grew downward from the upper jaw.

After realizing Jude had tripped on a fossilized tusk, the Sparks contacted Peter Houde, a biology professor at NMSU who is also the curator-in-charge at the university's The Vertebrate Museum
https://www.livescience.com/59881-boy-d ... skull.html



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1054

Post by Foggy » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:18 am

One half of my atoms come from other galaxies than the Milky Way.

http://www.rawstory.com/2017/07/half-of ... -galaxies/

Hence, the Galactic Grand Jury has only a questionable claim of jurisdiction over me. :fingerwag:


Karma is a bitch." - Jomas Thefferson

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1055

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Jul 27, 2017 9:59 am

Foggy wrote:One half of my atoms come from other galaxies than the Milky Way.

http://www.rawstory.com/2017/07/half-of ... -galaxies/

Hence, the Galactic Grand Jury has only a questionable claim of jurisdiction over me. :fingerwag:
Does that make it officially a "half-assed" claim?


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1056

Post by Foggy » Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:58 pm



Karma is a bitch." - Jomas Thefferson

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1057

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Jul 31, 2017 9:13 am

We are going to need a bigger universe map.
http://www.ibtimes.com/first-exomoon-fo ... et-2571924
First Exomoon Found? Scientists May Have Discovered A Moon Orbiting An Exoplanet

Scientists may have discovered a moon orbiting an exoplanet for the first time ever.

The team, headed by an astronomer from Columbia University, are reporting that they found evidence of a moon circling a planet outside of our solar system, although the findings have not yet been confirmed and will require further observations. If they turn out to be correct, the moon’s existence could tell experts more about the makeup of the universe as well as our own solar system.

If this hunch proves to be real, it would be the first moon outside our solar system ever discovered.

It may also be the largest moon discovered anywhere: The scientists estimate that it is roughly the size of Neptune, which would make its host planet perhaps the size of Jupiter, the largest planet in this solar system.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1058

Post by p0rtia » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:12 pm

The awesomest: Astronomy Pic of the Day posts NASA's Pluto flyover. That we should live in an era where we could see this.

Pluto Flyover

I posted this link rather than the Youtube because APD give some info on what you're seeing.


No matter where you go, there you are! :towel:

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1059

Post by Notorial Dissent » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:22 pm

If they are right, that is some planet and moon.


The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1060

Post by TollandRCR » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:27 pm

Amazing views. I think the status of Pluto as a planet needs reconsideration.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1061

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:29 am

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-40780491
Did the first flower look like this?
_97141772_flower_model_obligue7_5000x4000.jpg
All living flowers ultimately derive from a single ancestor that lived about 140 million years ago, a study suggests.
Scientists combined models of flower evolution with the largest data set of features from living flowers ever assembled.
From this the team was able to infer the appearance of the ancestral flower.
The flower had many concentric cycles of petal-like organs in sets of three, arranged in whorls, and was bisexual.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1062

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:16 pm

Looks just like the magnolias in my front yard.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1063

Post by Notorial Dissent » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:44 pm

Neat.


The fact that you sincerely and wholeheartedly believe that the “Law of Gravity” is unconstitutional and a violation of your sovereign rights, does not absolve you of adherence to it.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1064

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:34 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:Looks just like the magnolias in my front yard.
It does look like magnolias! I wonder what the fragrance was like?


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1065

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:35 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote:Looks just like the magnolias in my front yard.
It does look like magnolias! I wonder what the fragrance was like?
Heavenly, if it smells like a magnolia too.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1066

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Aug 02, 2017 9:40 pm

Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote:Looks just like the magnolias in my front yard.
It does look like magnolias! I wonder what the fragrance was like?
Heavenly, if it smells like a magnolia too.
Yes!!!!


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1067

Post by RoadScholar » Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:24 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote:
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: It does look like magnolias! I wonder what the fragrance was like?
Heavenly, if it smells like a magnolia too.
Yes!!!!
Hard to say. They say it was bisexual (ambisexual? hemaphroditic?) so it would have no need to attract pollinators. But there may have been another reason for it to have evolved fragrance, so who knows. I'd like to believe it smelled lovely.


The bitterest truth is healthier than the sweetest lie.
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1068

Post by Slartibartfast » Wed Aug 02, 2017 11:34 pm

RoadScholar wrote:
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sugar Magnolia wrote: Heavenly, if it smells like a magnolia too.
Yes!!!!
Hard to say. They say it was bisexual (ambisexual? hemaphroditic?) so it would have no need to attract pollinators. But there may have been another reason for it to have evolved fragrance, so who knows. I'd like to believe it smelled lovely.
I'm guessing that the sense of smell evolved so that things like that smelled good. In other words, when it first arose it probably didn't smell because there was no one around to smell it.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1069

Post by GlimDropper » Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:33 am

Army discovery may offer new energy source
ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. -- Army scientists and engineers recently made a groundbreaking discovery -- an aluminum nanomaterial of their design produces high amounts of energy when it comes in contact with water, or with any liquid containing water.

During routine materials experimentation at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, a team of researchers observed a bubbling reaction when adding water to a nano-galvanic aluminum-based powder.

<Snip>

The reaction surprised the researchers, but they soon considered its potential implications for future power and energy applications.

"The hydrogen that is given off can be used as a fuel in a fuel cell," said Scott Grendahl, a materials engineer and team leader. "What we discovered is a mechanism for a rapid and spontaneous hydrolysis of water."
Elsewhere in the article they mention the material may be 3D printed. This comes very close to too good to be true but let's see what comes of it.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1070

Post by rpenner » Mon Aug 07, 2017 12:52 am

Aluminum is the "fuel" of thermite, it is usually isolated beyond a transparent layer of aluminum oxide which is why we think of aluminum as a stable material.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1071

Post by Foggy » Mon Aug 07, 2017 5:33 am

My father-in-law was a metallurgical engineer and spent a lot of WWII with a group trying to invent "aluminum foam," which would absorb enemy artillery. He would have loved to hear about this.

But what does it cost to make nano-galvanic powder.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1072

Post by Chilidog » Mon Aug 07, 2017 7:29 am

Slartibartfast wrote:
RoadScholar wrote:
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote: Yes!!!!
Hard to say. They say it was bisexual (ambisexual? hemaphroditic?) so it would have no need to attract pollinators. But there may have been another reason for it to have evolved fragrance, so who knows. I'd like to believe it smelled lovely.
I'm guessing that the sense of smell evolved so that things like that smelled good. In other words, when it first arose it probably didn't smell because there was no one around to smell it.
If I had to guess, I would think that a sense of smell and the ability to use odors for hunting food or sex arose before the visual attraction of the flower.

In other words, the sense of smell predates the ability to see.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1073

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:34 am

Interesting point, Chili.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1074

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Aug 07, 2017 8:42 am

https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech ... ceshiptwo/

CAN WE GET ONE, FOGGY????? PUHLEEZE?
VIRGIN GALACTIC’S SIXTH TEST FLIGHT IS ITS MOST NOTABLE YET


It wasn’t so long ago that we were celebrating Virgin Galactic’s return to the skies after a two-year hiatus. And now, just over a year later, the company has conducted its sixth test glide with the VSS Unity. While we celebrated Virgin Galactic’s first couple test runs last December, this latest achievement is notable because it was a dry run for real rocket-powered flights. It carried propulsion components onboard, as well as 1,000 pounds of water to mimic the weight of fuel casing.

“Our major first today though was that with the exception of the rocket motor fuel grain, called the CTN (Case-Throat-Nozzle), we flew with all the spaceship’s principle propulsion components on-board and live,” Virgin Galactic announced. “This meant that Unity took off with her forward pressurant tank loaded with helium and for the first time, her centrally positioned Main Oxidizer Tank fully charged with nitrous oxide.”

The test is said to have gone “smoothly,” as Unity’s mothership, Eve, took both aircraft past 40,000 feet to the drop point. “After a clean separation from Eve and an approach-to-stall test, Unity’s tail-booms were raised into their re-entry position for the second time in flight,” Virgin Galactic noted. “Once back into the normal glide configuration, the pilots used the descent to execute the remaining test points, including a high-g pull-up maneuver and bank-to-bank rolls.”


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1075

Post by Sam the Centipede » Mon Aug 07, 2017 10:19 am

Chilidog wrote:
Slartibartfast wrote:
RoadScholar wrote: Hard to say. They say it was bisexual (ambisexual? hemaphroditic?) so it would have no need to attract pollinators. But there may have been another reason for it to have evolved fragrance, so who knows. I'd like to believe it smelled lovely.
I'm guessing that the sense of smell evolved so that things like that smelled good. In other words, when it first arose it probably didn't smell because there was no one around to smell it.
If I had to guess, I would think that a sense of smell and the ability to use odors for hunting food or sex arose before the visual attraction of the flower.

In other words, the sense of smell predates the ability to see.
The sense of smell is certainly more primitive in mammals, including humans. But wind and insects are the main pollination agents for flowering plants, not vertebrates. For wind, both color and scent are irrelevant, and insects were already well-evolved and flying around like lunatics 150 million years ago with seeing and sniffing - they'd already been around about 200 million years! Insects can be extremely sensitive to both color and scent (depending on species), so either or both might be a great cue. The insect responds to the cue and finds the reward it expects (either pollen or nectar) while the flower exchanges pollen to and from the insec. Unlike the wind, the insect is likely to take the pollen to another conspecific flower, so it's an efficient mechanism.

A hermaphrodite plant is not necessarily capable of self-pollination, and many have mechanisms to try to prevent that occurring. Evolutionary genetics makes it A Good Thing to out-breed, to exploit the diversity of the gene pool. Different groups of organisms have different mechanisms to reduce in-breeding, such as multiple mating types in some fungi.

Plants and insects have co-evolved to their mutual benefit: insects have a food resource (and sometimes a home) and plants get over the problems of being rooted to one spot, which makes dating difficult. And sometimes there are other benefits (such as nasty biting ants protecting their host plants against other herbivores).



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