Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#126

Post by Addie » Wed Dec 30, 2015 4:54 pm

I'm not getting the why of this.

Gizmodo
The Future of Architecture Is Already Happening in Portland

Framework sounds like a futuristic, Frakenstein-like treehouse. But as one of two winners of a contest for high-rise buildings built out of wood, it’s a actually a glimpse into the future of urban architecture.

The 12-story design will be one of the tallest wooden buildings in the United States once it’s completed—and many hope it will start a drive for more such buildings. Oregon-based architecture firm Lever Architecture designed Framework to be built in its hometown of Portland. In late September, the plan was named West Coast Winner of the USDA’s Tall Wood Buildings Prize competition, given out in September with support from the Softwood Lumber Board. The East Coast Winner, a 10-story design for 475 West 18th Street, will be built in New York. With its dozen floors, Framework is the taller of the two, designed to be smaller skyscraper with shops on the ground floor and offices and apartments up top. It could also be the tallest wooden skyscraper in the country when completed. ...

The new structures use cross-laminated wood panels as building supports. These panels are created by pressing planks of wood together with the grain alternating directions, until they make one, huge beam. These beams are already supporting taller and taller buildings. Safety restrictions, originally designed to prevent structures made with conventional wood from collapsing, are still in place, however. Those need to be changed before truly massive wood skyscrapers become the norm.

Framework will still be using some concrete as the foundation for the building in its design. It will be bisected by a central core to help support its mass. The rest of the support will be done by the framework of beams that give the building its name. One particularly ambitious decorative touch will be a wall of hanging plants going down one side of the structure. If we want to make wilder cities, that would be a good way to start.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#127

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Wed Dec 30, 2015 5:11 pm

Because deforestation is a good thing.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#128

Post by TollandRCR » Wed Dec 30, 2015 5:20 pm

I connect this to the sovcit doings in Harney County in the sense that the Oregon economy has been badly hurt by restrictions on logging. Harney County was once relatively prosperous (for Oregon) with strong lumber and cattle industries. As in many other Oregon counties, those industries are no longer sources of prosperity. I'm sure the Portland designers of this building had no thought of sovcit activities, but I would bet they thought of Oregon's lumber industry. I consider this to be the showpiece for an effort to bring wood back into the structure of tall buildings.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#129

Post by Shizzle Popped » Wed Dec 30, 2015 6:44 pm

I'm not sure how I would feel about living in a twelve story wood frame building. I would need to know a lot more about what they're doing about fire control and evacuation plans. That's an awful lot of kindling as the buildings get older and the wood gets drier. What (sort of) works now for seven story buildings is probably completely inadequate for anything over ten floors.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#130

Post by Addie » Tue Apr 05, 2016 8:27 am

Culture Map
East Austin village opens, renting houses to homeless for $225 a month

Image

On Saturday, East Austin’s Community First Village opened after years of anticipation. The village is the brainchild of Alan Graham, who has been dedicated to helping people who are homeless for nearly 20 years.

Community First is a groundbreaking development designed for the homeless population of Austin. Located on Hog Eye Road near Walter E. Long Park, the community is 27 acres containing 140 tiny homes. Each home is 180 square feet with a porch, and residents have access to communal outdoor kitchens, private bathrooms, showers, and laundry facilities.

The community also boasts covered RVs and tipis for additional living spaces, a medical center, movie amphitheater from Alamo Drafthouse, community garden, a woodworking shop, chapel, and market.

Currently there are about 40 people living at Community First with rent starting around $225 per month. By the end of the year, 150 or so people are expected to be living there, and the development is projected to reach its capacity of 250 people by early 2017.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#131

Post by Addie » Sun May 08, 2016 10:37 am

Metro News
A village made entirely out plastic bottles is being built in Panama

Image ...

A small team in Panama hopes to find a use for the 15,000 bottles the average person discards in their lifetime by using them to build houses and other buildings.

Justine and Jeff Catalano’s Plast Bottle Village costs between £104,000 and £208,000 and contains vegetable and herb gardens, a ‘yoga-exercise pavilion, hiking trails, and small manicured mini-parks for barbecues, and outdoor gatherings.’

The PBV, which is still in construction, will cover around 83 acres of Panamanian jungle, and will have between 90 and 120 homes when completed.

Each home uses 10,000 to 25,000 bottles, which, the Catalanos say, ‘goes some way towards leaving nothing behind but your footprints.’


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#132

Post by RoadScholar » Mon May 09, 2016 6:16 am

Sterngard Friegen wrote:Because deforestation is a good thing.
The lumber going into these is probably farmed. That said, harvesting trees from never-cut forests should be a capital offense.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#133

Post by Plutodog » Mon May 09, 2016 6:38 am

Addie wrote:Curbed
NYC's Defunct Pay Phones Begin Transition Into Wi-Fi Kiosks

Image

New York City is finally kicking into gear its plan to convert the abundant supply of defunct payphones into Wi-Fi hot spots. A Verge contributor spotted one of the helpful technology boxes being installed on the corner of East 15th Street and Third Avenue, Manhattan, this morning, meaning the city is making good on its promise to begin delivering the 7,500 kiosks that will give users access to free Wi-Fi, charging stations, a touch-screen panel loaded with information like city services and directions, and allow them to make free domestic calls (albeit on speaker phone) before the end of 2015.

According to The Verge, hundreds of other hubs will be installed throughout the city in the days to come, meaning free Wi-Fi for all!—or at least all of those standing within 150 feet of a hub.

The kiosks will also have two 55-inch advertising displays that the city estimates will help generate $500 million in revenue over the next 12 years.
Update:

https://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/201604 ... ird-avenue

Image
UPPER EAST SIDE — Locals can now surf the Web, make phone calls and charge their phones for free at more than a dozen kiosks along Third Avenue that are up and running.

The machines, which were installed in February as part of the city's LinkNYC project to replace 7,500 pay phones with the kiosks, were activated last week.

The kiosks can be found along Third Avenue at East 60th, 66th, 68th, 69th, 77th, 80th, 82nd, 83rd, 84th, 85th 86th, 87th, 90th, 91st, 92nd, and 95th streets.

The kiosks at 66th, 84th, 85th and 86th streets are not yet online, according to LinkNYC data.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#134

Post by Addie » Fri May 27, 2016 12:17 pm

Not to my taste, but kind of fun and strangely well-done.

The New Yorker (SLIDE SHOW)
High Aspirations

The Bolivian architect Freddy Mamani Silvestre doesn’t have an office, use a computer, or draw formal blueprints. He sketches his plans on a wall or transmits them orally to his associates. Since 2005, Mamani and his firm have completed sixty projects in El Alto, the world’s highest city, which sits at nearly fourteen thousand feet, on an austere plateau above La Paz. In the past twenty years, the economy there has burgeoned, along with an enterprising, mostly indigenous population. Mamani earned his fame building mixed-use dream houses for the city’s nouveaux riches.

Like most of his clients, and like some 1.6 million of his fellow-citizens, Mamani is an Aymara. His people have been subject to successive waves of conquest and dispossession, first by the Inca, then by the Spanish. As a young man, he worked in construction; in his early twenties, he earned a degree in civil engineering, against the advice of his family. “It’s a career for the rich,” they told him. Architecture, too, is a career for the rich. But Mamani has made an advantage of his outsider status; he designs in an Aymara vernacular of his own invention.

Each of his houses has a futuristic façade, a commercial ground floor with jazzy shop fronts, a baroque party hall on the mezzanine, a story or two of apartments, and an owner’s penthouse. This aerie is sometimes called a cholet, a pun on the words “chalet” and “cholo”—a dismissive racial epithet that cholos like Mamani have proudly embraced. Mamani’s architecture incorporates circular motifs from Aymara weaving and ceramics and the neon colors of Aymara dress, and it alludes to the staggered planes of Andean temples. But it has also been inspired by science fiction, particularly by the Transformer movies. It might be called, like the second film in the saga, “Revenge of the Fallen.”


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#135

Post by Whatever4 » Fri May 27, 2016 2:41 pm

Alrighty. Good to know what I really don't like.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#136

Post by tek » Fri May 27, 2016 4:56 pm

This aerie is sometimes called a cholet, a pun on the words “chalet cheezy” and “cholo toilet”—a dismissive racial epithet that cholos like Mamani have proudly embraced. ]
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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#137

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sat May 28, 2016 6:26 am

Addie wrote:Not to my taste, but kind of fun and strangely well-done.

The New Yorker (SLIDE SHOW)
I love these! There is such a feeling of joy and playfulness about them that I find irresistible. I also love the combination of sharp angles and flowing, looping curves. The fact that he pulls these out of his head and then conveys his vision to others without blueprints or renderings is the sign of a true artist to me. He has a vision that is strong enough that others can "see" it as well. I'm also impressed by the fact that he has a clear plan of how the buildings will ultimately be used. Retail, social and living spaces all combined in a logical, cohesive design. It thrills me. Add to that the fact that he's obviously thought through the actual use of the space and the conditions of the site, by including such things as the specific windows in the penthouse level to take advantage of the sun for heating. He's also honoring the traditions and culture of the area by "incorporating circular motifs from Aymara weaving and ceramics and the neon colors of Aymara dress, and it alludes to the staggered planes of Andean temples."

From the perspective of an artist and designer, it doesn't get much better than this.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#138

Post by TollandRCR » Sat May 28, 2016 9:02 am

Without the benefit of any professional training, I also have to say I like the Aymara architecture by Freddy Mamani Silvestre. Plus I really, really like the idea of mixed-use buildings. Look at the drab buildings that dominate that cityscape with the Illimani volcano in the distance.

This is at the market. The People of the Volcano deserve brightness and fun in their architecture as well as in their clothing:



Of course, I also like both sides of the Sagrada Familia cathedral in Barcelona.

Maybe we should hear from Prince Charles.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#139

Post by Addie » Sat May 28, 2016 9:22 am

Yeah, I've looked at the slideshow a number of times now and the more I've seen, the more I've appreciated the vernacular fit and the joy of it.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#140

Post by Sugar Magnolia » Sat May 28, 2016 11:02 am

I have gone back to the photos over and over this morning. There is just something about them that draws me in. No matter how closely I look at any one photo, when I go back to it I find something I missed the first time.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#141

Post by Whatever4 » Sat May 28, 2016 3:23 pm

There's a reason I live in New England.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#142

Post by Volkonski » Fri Jul 22, 2016 4:36 pm

Another idealist setting himself up to fail in an attempt to create an utopian community.

The design flaws are obvious. There is no economic engine to support 20,000 more people in that part of rural Vermont. That is why it is still rural. In the modern world cities grow where it is possible to make money. Business and industry (or government operations) come first and cities grow around them.

He also overlooks how humans behave. Anyone who starts a successful business that does something other than serve the needs of local residents is going to move away. Those successful entrepreneurs will eventually need more space which will be unavailable in the planned community. They will want to keep their IP rights and they will want to keep their profits.

Then there is the issue of growing families. What happens when two people each with 200 sq. ft apartments get married and have children?

A Mormon Tycoon Wants to Build Joseph Smith’s Mega-Utopia in Vermont

http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016- ... on-utopia/
On the scheduled day, Antal parked her red Toyota Tacoma pickup next to a nearby bridge, known among locals for having reliable phone reception. She pulled out a Moleskine notebook, summoned her courage, and dialed Hall. They introduced themselves and talked about their respective backgrounds and interests, and then, over the span of an hour, Hall blew Antal’s mind. Yes, he said, he was planning an elaborate, 20,000-person community that would extend over four small towns, including hers, and the blueprint was based on the so-called Plat of the City of Zion, a Mormon document depicting a vision that Joseph Smith and two colleagues jotted down in 1833. And while that all sounded a bit far-fetched, Hall revealed that he already had more than 150 engineers working on technology and architecture for the project. “One hundred and fifty engineers!” says Antal. “Before then, it was all just conceptual. All of the sudden it seemed like, oh my God, this is going to happen tomorrow.”

:snippity:

The plats, Hall says, are designed to incorporate agricultural, industrial, commercial, and residential space. The entire community is pedestrian and exploits layout tricks to sustain individual privacy and views of nature. Rooftop farms will make use of advanced techniques drawn from marijuana cultivation, and box-shaped greenhouses will improve yields and prevent the spread of disease and insects. Ground-floor spaces will be occupied by businesses, all connected by enclosed walkways and space for moving “pods” that transport the sick and elderly.

Within the community, each person will be allotted just 200 square feet of living space, but apartments will be soundproofed, with Roomba-sized robots that rearrange furniture for different needs and times of day. Each robot, Hall says, will move quickly, “then go right back into its nest.” Furnishings and possessions not being used will be stored inside 4-by-4-foot boxes that are integrated into the apartment floors and electronically move up and down as needed. “We’re still a few years off from having that work, but it’s not Dreamsville—it’s technically feasible,” says Hall. (And on trend: NArchitects has just completed a 55-unit building of 260- to 360-sq.-foot apartments on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, though it relies on solutions such as Murphy beds instead of robots.) Multipurpose buildings will serve as schools, conference centers, sports halls, and houses of worship, both Mormon and non-Mormon. To help maintain wilderness and animal habitat, and stop urban sprawl, each community will be surrounded by thousands of acres of unplanned nature. Livestock will also be kept outside the towns—along with what he calls “sustainable drilling sites,” used to extract building materials and natural resources.

:snippity:

Legally, the communities will be owned by a trust that operates two for-profit entities: a property holding company and a capital fund that controls intellectual property and most financial assets. Families and individuals who wish to join must invest their net worth and be employed either outside the communities or by a NewVistas company, or Vista Biz. Those who start Vista Bizzes will be given startup funds by the community but must surrender their IP rights. They also must agree to put nearly all their profits back into the community in exchange for what Hall calls “dividends”—payouts from overall wealth earned by the plat businesses. But everyone is also free to leave and take their companies with them, if dissatisfied. “Competition and the freedom to walk is crucial,” he says
.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#143

Post by Flatpointhigh » Fri Jul 22, 2016 7:20 pm

sounds like a ponzi scheme



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#144

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Aug 03, 2016 11:18 am

new infrastructure
China's elevated bus: Futuristic 'straddling bus' hits the road

It may look like something from the future, but China's long-awaited "straddling bus" ran its inaugural test in Hebei province this week.

The 2m-high Transit Elevated Bus (TEB) straddles the cars below, allowing them to pass through.

Powered by electricity, the bus is able to carry up to 300 passengers in its 72ft (21m) long and 25ft wide body.

A video of a mini-model of the vehicle caused great excitement when it was released in May.

The trial run was conducted on a 300m-long controlled track in the north-eastern city of Qinhuangdao.
The vehicle is expected to reach speeds of up to 60km per hour, running on rails laid along ordinary roads. Up to four TEBs can be linked together.

"The biggest advantage is that the bus will save lots of road space," the project's chief engineer, Song Youzhou, told state-media agency Xinhua earlier this year.

"The TEB has the same functions as the subway, while its cost of construction is less than one fifth of the subway," another engineer Bai Zhiming told news outlet CCTV.

One TEB could replace 40 conventional buses, according to the firm. However, it is unclear when the vehicle will be widely used in Chinese cities.
Many images at the link.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-36961433



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#145

Post by esseff44 » Tue Aug 09, 2016 11:31 pm

The shiny new skyscraper is sinking and leaning. They engineers are blaming it on the big dig next to it for the superduper transit center being built next door. They folks who paid multi-millions for their sky high condos are a wee bit perturbed. The lawsuits have begun to be filed.

(Not to mention it's built on stuff that turns to liquid in an earthquake.)

http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/F ... 132750.php



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#146

Post by vic » Wed Aug 10, 2016 12:29 am

That Chinese elevated bus? Not so much.

Even the Chinese People's Daily has its doubts:

http://en.people.cn/n3/2016/0804/c90000-9094963.html
:snippity:
Although the idea sounds superb, almost too good to be realistic, many questions still need to be answered about the feasibility of the straddling bus, most importantly how it is going to solve thesafety issues that lots of experts have raised against it.

The height limit on Chinese roads is 4.5 meters tall, and many elevated roads in Chinese cities have height limit around 4.2 meters. Nonetheless, the designed height of the TEB-1 is 4.8 meters, with the room left beneath it for the cars to pass through being restricted to 2.1 meters and below. The figure is far much smaller than the national standard of height limit for smaller vehicles in China.

Moreover, the 1200 passengers TEB compartment can carry, together with the TEB-1 itself, will likely to generate a total of over 100 tons’ weight on roads, which most of the Chinese roads can’t hold up to.

Other safety concerns like the TEB blocking the road signs, and car drivers passing through the elevated bus won’t be able to change lanes, are yet to be answered. The applauses generated from the road test photos might be a bit too early.
The bus hasn't yet been completely assembled, so the road test didn't happen.

Other articles report that:

Trucks can't pass underneath, and with 2m clearance, larger cars can't, either.

Strictly speaking, it's a train, not a bus, and further, can only go straight. Turning is not possible.

It is too tall for many overpasses.

Cars underneath it cannot see signs or traffic signals. Once you're underneath, you are potentially captive.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#147

Post by Northland10 » Wed Aug 10, 2016 1:35 pm

vic wrote:It is too tall for many overpasses.
That's not a concern for some truck drivers around here.


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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#148

Post by vic » Wed Aug 10, 2016 1:44 pm

Northland10 wrote:
vic wrote:It is too tall for many overpasses.
That's not a concern for some truck drivers around here.
Yeah but trucks have steering so when that overpass suddenly jumps in front of them they think theycan try to steer around it :-D ; the "bus" drives on track so it doesn't have that option.

:sarcastic:



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#149

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Wed Aug 10, 2016 1:55 pm

The "bus" is a gimmick. Just build monorails that run in both directions.



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Re: Innovative Architecture and Infrastructure

#150

Post by vic » Wed Aug 10, 2016 2:04 pm

Sterngard Friegen wrote:The "bus" is a gimmick. Just build monorails that run in both directions.
That would make sense if the goal of the project was to move passengers. However, I believe the goal is to get money. The project is being funded in a manner similar to kickstarter. You can't get naïve folks investing in a project that uses time-tested technology. You've got to offer something with a lot of sizzle.



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