Astronomy and Space

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RVInit
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#26

Post by RVInit » Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:36 pm

The Pillars of Creation portion of the Eagle Nebula is one of my favorite Hubble photos. It looks a little different in my telescope at home. :P


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#27

Post by Sterngard Friegen » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:21 pm

Holy moly! It's giraffes all the way down!



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#28

Post by Estiveo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:28 pm

:fingerwag: Camelopardalis.


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RVInit
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#29

Post by RVInit » Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:30 pm

Estiveo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 7:28 pm
:fingerwag: Camelopardalis.
:lol:


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#30

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:34 pm

$6.00????!!!!!!!!! Now I can't get Foggy a Christmas/Hanukkah/Eid/Kwanzaa present! :eek2:
Edit: It is a purty pitcher.


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#31

Post by neeneko » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:38 pm

maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:11 pm
Well then allow me to brag. We can see not one, not two, but three galaxies from our back yard, according to my physics geek sister, who pointed out all three to us when she visited. There is zero light pollution here.
*grumbles something about falling space rocks and sensitive pieces of anatomy*

Seriously though, that is really cool.



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RVInit
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#32

Post by RVInit » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:40 pm

neeneko wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:38 pm
maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 6:11 pm
Well then allow me to brag. We can see not one, not two, but three galaxies from our back yard, according to my physics geek sister, who pointed out all three to us when she visited. There is zero light pollution here.
*grumbles something about falling space rocks and sensitive pieces of anatomy*

Seriously though, that is really cool.
:like:


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#33

Post by maydijo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:50 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:34 pm
$6.00????!!!!!!!!! Now I can't get Foggy a Christmas/Hanukkah/Eid/Kwanzaa present! :eek2:
Edit: It is a purty pitcher.
Don't believe a word of it. John P Capitalist is a money-bags, he didn't get the photo printed off at Costco, he paid NASA to deliver the Pillars of Creation straight to his apartment.



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#34

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:52 pm

maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:50 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:34 pm
$6.00????!!!!!!!!! Now I can't get Foggy a Christmas/Hanukkah/Eid/Kwanzaa present! :eek2:
Edit: It is a purty pitcher.
Don't believe a word of it. John P Capitalist is a money-bags, he didn't get the photo printed off at Costco, he paid NASA to deliver the Pillars of Creation straight to his apartment.
Now that would be really cool. Do the Pillars fit in an apartment?


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#35

Post by maydijo » Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:53 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:52 pm
maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:50 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:34 pm
$6.00????!!!!!!!!! Now I can't get Foggy a Christmas/Hanukkah/Eid/Kwanzaa present! :eek2:
Edit: It is a purty pitcher.
Don't believe a word of it. John P Capitalist is a money-bags, he didn't get the photo printed off at Costco, he paid NASA to deliver the Pillars of Creation straight to his apartment.
Now that would be really cool. Do the Pillars fit in an apartment?
They do in John P Capitalist's apartment. It's YUGE!



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#36

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:52 pm

maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:53 pm
Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:52 pm
maydijo wrote:
Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:50 pm


Don't believe a word of it. John P Capitalist is a money-bags, he didn't get the photo printed off at Costco, he paid NASA to deliver the Pillars of Creation straight to his apartment.
Now that would be really cool. Do the Pillars fit in an apartment?
They do in John P Capitalist's apartment. It's YUGE!
He own his own Court House :?:



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Notorial Dissent
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#37

Post by Notorial Dissent » Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:16 am

That is one of my all time favorite Hubble pictures.


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RVInit
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#38

Post by RVInit » Fri Dec 08, 2017 6:32 pm



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#39

Post by Foggy » Sat Dec 09, 2017 6:12 am

Fake Moons! :cussing:


... and how does that make you feel?
What is it you're trying to say?
:think:

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Re: Astronomy and Space

#40

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sat Dec 09, 2017 9:03 am

It would look real purty in a ring or a necklace.


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#41

Post by RVInit » Sat Dec 09, 2017 12:18 pm



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#42

Post by RVInit » Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:08 am



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#43

Post by tencats » Tue Dec 12, 2017 2:38 am

Alien Probe or Galactic Driftwood? SETI Tunes In to 'Oumuamua
It’s a long shot, but scientists are about to listen very closely for radio signals from our solar system’s first known interstellar visitor
https://www.scientificamerican.com/arti ... -oumuamua/
Ever since its discovery in mid-October as it passed by Earth already outbound from our solar system, the mysterious object dubbed ‘Oumuamua (Hawaiian for “first messenger”) has left scientists utterly perplexed. Zooming down almost perpendicularly inside Mercury’s orbit at tens of thousands of kilometers per hour—too fast for our star’s gravity to catch—‘Oumuamua appeared to have been dropped in on our solar system from some great interstellar height, picking up even more speed on a slingshot-like loop around the sun before soaring away for parts unknown. It is now already halfway to Jupiter, too far for a rendezvous mission and rapidly fading from the view of Earth’s most powerful telescopes.

Astronomers scrambling to glimpse the fading object have revealed additional oddities. ‘Oumuamua was never seen to sprout a comet-like tail after getting close to the sun, hinting it is not a relatively fresh bit of icy flotsam from the outskirts of a nearby star system. This plus its deep red coloration—which mirrors that of some cosmic-ray-bombarded objects in our solar system—suggested that ‘Oumuamua could be an asteroid from another star. Yet those same observations also indicate ‘Oumuamua might be shaped rather like a needle, up to 800 meters long and only 80 wide, spinning every seven hours and 20 minutes. That would mean it is like no asteroid ever seen before, instead resembling the collision-minimizing form favored in many designs for notional interstellar probes. What’s more, it is twirling at a rate that could tear a loosely-bound rubble pile apart. Whatever ‘Oumuamua is, it appears to be quite solid—likely composed of rock, or even metal—seemingly tailor-made to weather long journeys between stars. So far there are few if any wholly satisfactory explanations as to how such an extremely elongated solid object could naturally form, let alone endure the forces of a natural high-speed ejection from a star system—a process thought to involve a wrenching encounter with a giant planet.

These bizarre characteristics have raised eyebrows among professional practitioners of SETI, the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, who use large radio telescopes to listen for interstellar radio transmissions from other cosmic civilizations. If ‘Oumuamua is in fact artificial, the reasoning goes, it might be transmitting or at least leaking radio waves.
Animation of `Oumuamua passing through the Solar System (annotated)


Breakthrough Listen Is Eavesdropping on Strange Interstellar Object 'Oumuamua https://www.space.com/39046-interstella ... oject.html



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#44

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Tue Dec 12, 2017 8:46 am

RVInit wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 1:08 am
Cool!!!! AND music by Vangelis. :thumbs:


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#45

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:26 am

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technolo ... smsnnews11

NASA picks two finalists for upcoming space missions: a trip to a comet and one to Saturn's moon Titan

The first mission, spearheaded by Steve Squyres at Cornell University, is called CAESAR, or Comet Astrobiology Exploration Sample Return. It will involve sending a spacecraft to comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the same comet recently explored by the European Space Agency, collecting at least 3.5 ounces of samples from the comet’s surface, and returning those samples back to Earth. The mission will collect the organic compounds which constitute the building blocks of life in order to try to understand how comets contributed to life on Earth. “Comets are among the most scientifically important objects in the Solar System but they’re also among the most poorly understood,” Squyres said at a press conference. “I think it’s going to produce groundbreaking science for decades to come.”

The second mission, spearheaded by Elizabeth Turtle at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, is called Dragonfly. It’ll involve sending a helicopter-like robot to the surface of Titan, one of Saturn’s moons. Titan’s considered one of the best candidates for alien life. The Dragonfly mission proposes a so-called dual-quadcopter, which will hop from site to site to take a variety of measurements, including what the surface is made of, how it’s layered, and what the atmospheric conditions are.

NASA’s New Frontiers program aims to develop missions to explore planets and bodies in the Solar System. Missions conceived through the program are considered medium-class, meaning they’re not as costly as NASA’s big, multi-billion-dollar flagship missions, like the Curiosity Mars rover. But these missions usually run around $1 billion, making them a little more expensive than the space agency’s smaller Discovery missions — like the Dawn spacecraft orbiting around the dwarf planet Ceres — which hover around less than half a billion dollars.


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#46

Post by RTH10260 » Thu Dec 21, 2017 9:29 am

:twisted: Heads Off :!: Teh Donald wants his generals man on the moon preparing green cheese for his deplorables ! :lol:



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#47

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:41 am

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... SKULL.html

🎵It's beginning to look a lot like... Halloween...🎵
Return of skull-shaped asteroid: Massive space rock will pass Earth again next year after its 'close' Halloween flyby of 2015
The space rock first passed our planet on October 31, 2015, in time for Halloween
Experts studying the 2015 flyby published a paper detailing their observations
The comet's approach led to claims that it could spell doom for planet Earth
Its comeback will give scientists opportunity to study the strange object again


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... z52BnhhmiP
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
477FA4B000000578-5201985-Earth_is_set_for_another_spooky_encounter_with_a_dead_comet_that-a-1_1513864439020.jpg
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Re: Astronomy and Space

#48

Post by RTH10260 » Sun Dec 24, 2017 10:31 am

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:41 am
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... SKULL.html

🎵It's beginning to look a lot like... Halloween...🎵
:snippity:
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... z52BnhhmiP
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook [/b]
477FA4B000000578-5201985-Earth_is_set_for_another_spooky_encounter_with_a_dead_comet_that-a-1_1513864439020.jpg
[/quote]

Anyone still doubting alien visits to spawn politicains on this planet ? ;)



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Re: Astronomy and Space

#49

Post by RVInit » Tue Jan 09, 2018 1:11 pm

I missed this one back in September. This is one of the pictures of the day, and near the bottom is a link to download the APOD 2018 calendar. It's too big to attach here, full of photos and links to past POD's. Nice.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap170925.html


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Re: Astronomy and Space

#50

Post by RTH10260 » Wed Jan 31, 2018 4:46 pm

Fogbowzers on the northern West Coast will be able to see some of the stuff (chart in article)
Super blue blood moon: when and where to see the rare lunar eclipse
Blue moon, super moon and blood moon will all coincide in 2018 for the first time since 1866

Michael Slezak
Wed 31 Jan 2018 14.23 GMT First published on Wed 31 Jan 2018 02.53 GMT

People from Moscow, via Sydney, to Washington DC will be given a rare celestial treat on Wednesday as three lunar phenomena coincide. Weather permitting, of course.

A blue moon (a second full moon in a calendar month), a super moon (when the moon is unusually close to Earth, making it bigger and brighter) and a blood moon (a moment during an eclipse when the moon appears red) will all coincide for the first time since 1866.

When to see it

If you live in the US, you will be able to see the eclipse – and the celestial trifecta – on Wednesday morning, just before the moon sets.

For those on the US east coast, the eclipse will start just before sunrise at 5.51am US ET, when the super blue moon will begin turning red. It will happen at 4.51am CT and those on the west coast can see it at 2.51am.

Stargazers living in the US will be able to see the eclipse before sunrise on Wednesday, according to Nasa.

For those further east – the Middle East, Asia, eastern Russia, Australia and New Zealand – the “super blue blood moon” can be seen during moonrise in the evening of 31 January, according to Nasa.

In Sydney, Australia, the eclipse will begin at a more reasonable time of 9.51pm on Wednesday night. That’s 10.51pm in New Zealand, 5.51pm in Shanghai and 12.51pm in Moscow.

How to see it

So long as there is no cloud cover, just look up at the sky!


https://www.theguardian.com/science/201 ... ar-eclipse



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