Science, General Stuff

Mr. Gneiss
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1101

Post by Mr. Gneiss » Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:07 pm

Following up with RTH10260's post, folks at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science have found a T-Rex tooth among the Triceratops fossils.

From an article in today's Denver Post.

T. rex tooth found in Thornton triceratops fossil trove
Museum workers found a T. rex tooth among the triceratops fossils on Thursday as they excavated prehistoric artifacts from a construction site in Thornton.

The T. rex was likely scavenging and came across the dead triceratops. But the excavators don’t expect to find any more of the large dinosaur — T. rex teeth sometimes fell out as they chowed down.

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science announced the discovery Friday during a press conference where workers opened a plaster cast used to transport the fossils, showing off the horn that alerted construction workers to the presence of the triceratops. Saunders Construction workers noticed an inch or half of the bone on Aug. 25, and immediately shut down their earth-moving machines. The museum’s dinosaur curator Joe Sertich said he visited the site the following Monday, expecting to find a couple of small chunks of bone. But within 30 minutes, he found three or four other fossils.

Workers have found about three-quarters of the triceratops skull along with its horns, jaw, jaw beak, frill, shoulder-blade, vertebrae, ribs and humerus. They don’t expect to find all of the bones as most animal skeletons are scattered after death by scavengers — such as a hungry T. rex — or water before they’re buried and fossilized.



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TollandRCR
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1102

Post by TollandRCR » Fri Sep 08, 2017 5:20 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
NASA’s Voyager Spacecraft Still Reaching for the Stars After 40 Years
I do like the notion of VG-1 returning to Earth to destroy it unless whales are still alive. But I am attached to whales. They may be the nicest people on the planet.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1103

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Sep 19, 2017 9:32 pm

Scientists complete eight month isolation experiment to simulate life on Mars

By Charlie Osborne for Between the Lines | September 19, 2017 -- 12:08 GMT (05:08 PDT) | Topic: Innovation

A group of six scientists isolated in a dome in Hawaii to simulate life on Mars have emerged.

The team, dubbed the Hawaiʻi Space Exploration Analog and Simulation (HI-SEAS) Mission V crew, exited a dome constructed on the slopes of Mauna Loa in Hawai'i after their eight-month experiment on September 17.

The UH Mānoa research project, made possible through funding provided by NASA, has been in operation since 2012. The aim of the project is to simulate what it would be like to start a colony on Mars to the best of our ability based on available data, and to resolve challenges on Earth before such a mission may be attempted in the future.

Samuel Paylor, another team member, said it was "really important" to get the human race off Earth to avoid mass extinction -- an attitude reflected in entrepreneur Elon Musk, who believes we must become a spacefaring race to stave off a Doomsday event.

While the team was kept busy with a range of experiments in their Mars-simulated environment, they also had to learn how to cope with the challenges.
http://www.zdnet.com/article/mars-resea ... on-emerge/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1104

Post by Volkonski » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:24 pm

Alarm as 'super malaria' spreads in South East Asia

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-41351160
This dangerous form of the malaria parasite cannot be killed with the main anti-malaria drugs.

It emerged in Cambodia but has since spread through parts of Thailand, Laos and has arrived in southern Vietnam.

The team at the Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit in Bangkok said there was a real danger of malaria becoming untreatable.

:snippity:

Prof Dondorp said the treatment was failing around a third of the time in Vietnam while in some regions of Cambodia the failure rate was closer to 60%.
About 92% of malaria cases occur in Africa. If this spreads there it will cause a catastrophe much worse than Ebola.


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1105

Post by Volkonski » Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:57 pm

:roll: :roll: :roll:
Suing for teaching evolution

https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.co ... evolution/
Open Letter to Physics and Biology Teachers

I filed a lawsuit against Columbia University and a government agency for violating the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States and disseminating misinformation about evolutionary biology (Docket No. 17-818, Second Circuit).  Upon information and belief, the science establishment in the United States is suppressing the following four scientific truths:

Human beings did not evolve from animals. What evolved from animals are hypothetical creatures without free will and the conscious knowledge of human beings.

See: https://www.academia.edu/23340072/WHY_P ... E_BIG_BANG

Natural selection only explains the adaptation of species to the environment, not common descent.

Charles Darwin contributed nothing to science. He was only a propagandist for eugenics.

The American Journal of Physics published an article titled “Entropy and Evolution” that disgraces every physicist in the United States. See:

https://www.academia.edu/20939526/An_An ... ted_States

David Roemer
I think David Roemer is this guy-

https://newevangelist.wordpress.com/about/


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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1106

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Oct 13, 2017 3:44 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Thu Oct 12, 2017 2:57 pm
:roll: :roll: :roll:
Suing for teaching evolution

https://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.co ... evolution/
Open Letter to Physics and Biology Teachers
:snippity: See:

https://www.academia.edu/20939526/An_An ... ted_States

David Roemer
I think David Roemer is this guy-

https://newevangelist.wordpress.com/about/
I think this guy is past his due date. :think:



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rpenner
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1107

Post by rpenner » Mon Oct 16, 2017 12:06 pm

David Roemer started with 17-cv-703 filed in NY Southern District. (filed Pro Se on 01/30/2017 , dismissed as frivolous on 02/24/2017) The complaint has nothing and specifically nothing about Columbia's teaching of evolution. Roemer was just pissed that he couldn't finagle an invitation to lecture an audience about his views of "cosmology" and God. He is suing not Columbia University but the Ethics panel (of the NY Bar?) for failing to take action on his ethics complaint about letter from an attorney that he cease his escalating behavior lest it be seen as harassment.
The second circuit case 17-818 is an appeal not against the dismissal but against the 03/22/2017 order denying the motion to disqualify the judge.


PACER: https://ecf.nysd.uscourts.gov/cgi-bin/DktRpt.pl?468320
RECAP (Mostly empty): http://archive.org/details/gov.uscourts.nysd.468320/



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1108

Post by Volkonski » Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:21 am

On the lighter side-

Alligators are Feasting on Sharks in America's Rivers and Estuaries, Scientists Discover

http://www.newsweek.com/alligators-are- ... ash-686519
The study of the stomach contents of 500 living alligators captured and examined by Kansas State University researcher James Nifong and IMSS wildlife biologist Russell Lowers unveiled four different species of sharks, including nurse sharks and stingrays.

:snippity:

Sharks have been spotted slipping into freshwater areas on occasion. Equally, while alligators lack salt glands—a requirement if their body is to filter the saltwater they plan on surviving in—the species can suss out whenever saltwater becomes temporarily diluted, after heavy rainfall for example.

“Alligators seek out fresh water in high-salinity environments,” said Nifong in a statement. “When it rains really hard, they can actually sip fresh water off the surface of the saltwater. That can prolong the time they can stay in a saltwater environment.”

Alligators are not inherently the victor in an altercation with any shark, however. In fact, as the relationship between the two species becomes closer, what the dynamic between them looks like is more of mutual hunting or “reciprocal predation.” In other words, it is likely that once hungry and pitted in the same environment, it is a question of size that determines if the alligator eats the shark or vice versa.


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RTH10260
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1109

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Oct 17, 2017 8:36 am

No neutrino emission from a binary neutron star merger
By Sílvia Bravo, 16 Oct 2017 09:00 AM

Today, the LIGO (http://ligo.org/) and Virgo collaborations have announced the detection of a new gravitational wave event, GW170817, which constitutes the first time that a binary neutron star merger has been detected with the LIGO observatory. This unique observation is even more compelling since the same collision was seen by the Fermi and INTEGRAL satellites as a result of a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) and, subsequently, across the electromagnetic spectrum, with radio, optical, and X-ray detections. These observations made it possible for the first time to pinpoint the source location of a gravitational wave event. The source was found to be in a galaxy 130 million light years away, known as NGC 4993.

In a joint effort by the ANTARES, IceCube, Pierre Auger, LIGO, and Virgo collaborations, scientists have searched for neutrino emission from this merger. The search looked for neutrinos in the GeV to EeV energy range and did not find any neutrino in directional coincidence
with the host galaxy. The nondetection agrees well with our expectation from short GRB models of observations at a large off-axis angle, which is most likely the case for the GRB detected in conjunction with GW170817. These results have just been submitted to The Astrophysical Journal.
http://icecube.wisc.edu/news/view/539



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1110

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Thu Oct 19, 2017 9:50 am

These younguns today are so damn smart!
http://www.businessinsider.com/winner-o ... er-2017-10
Gitanjali Rao, an 11-year-old from Lone Tree, Colorado, is the winner of this year's Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge for her sensor that can detect lead levels in water better than traditional methods.

Rao, whose victory was announced late in the evening of Tuesday, October 17, will take home $25,000 for the idea, which she said she developed approximately five months ago in response to learning about the ongoing water crisis in Flint, Michigan .


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1111

Post by tencats » Fri Oct 20, 2017 10:57 am

New tyrannosaur fossil is most complete found in southwestern US
October 19, 2017
A remarkable new fossilized skeleton of a tyrannosaur discovered in the Bureau of Land Management's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument (GSENM) in southern Utah was airlifted by helicopter Sunday, Oct 15, from a remote field site, and delivered to the Natural History Museum of Utah where it will be uncovered, prepared, and studied. The fossil is approximately 76 million years old and is most likely an individual of the species Teratophoneus curriei, one of Utah's ferocious tyrannosaurs that walked western North America between 66 and 90 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous Period.

"With at least 75 percent of its bones preserved, this is the most complete skeleton of a tyrannosaur ever discovered in the southwestern US," said Dr. Randall Irmis, curator of paleontology at the Museum and associate professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah. "We are eager to get a closer look at this fossil to learn more about the southern tyrannosaur's anatomy, biology, and evolution."

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-tyrannosa ... n.html#jCp
For a nice bunch of photos and video check out this in the dailymail.co.uk
Experts suspect the remains represent an individual of the species Teratophoneus curriei, which lived during the Late Cretaceous period 66-90 million years ago.

It’s thought to be a sub-adult individual, who stretched 17-20 feet long, though with a relatively short head.

‘With at least 75 percent of its bones preserved, this is the most complete skeleton of a tyrannosaur ever discovered in the southwestern US,’ said Dr Randall Irmis, curator of paleontology at the Museum and associate professor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Utah.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... z4w3ksDyba
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

http://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/ ... staircase/



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Sluffy1
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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1112

Post by Sluffy1 » Fri Oct 27, 2017 8:54 pm

It came from Beyond... never to return.

Image
For the first time that we know, an interstellar visitor has zoomed through our solar system. The small space rock, tentatively called A/2017 U1, is about a quarter of a mile long and astronomers across the world are racing to study it before it departs just as quickly as it arrived...
On Oct. 19, Dr. Weryk was reviewing images captured by the university’s Pan-STARRS 1 telescope on the island of Maui when he came across the object....
The object came closest to the Sun on Sept. 9, at a distance of about 23 million miles. With a boost from the star’s gravity, it zoomed by at about 55 miles per second with respect to the Sun, Dr. Farnocchia said. Then on Oct. 14 the object came within about 15 million miles of Earth...
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/27/scie ... ystem.html

That would have left a mark... never saw it coming.... not that we could have ducked in time.



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1113

Post by Foggy » Fri Oct 27, 2017 9:16 pm

:shock:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1114

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:05 pm

http://www.cnn.com/2017/10/31/asia/on-j ... index.html
Can Japan burn flammable ice for energy?

Having virtually no oil, coal or natural gas to fire its power plants, Japan was forced to import over 90% of its energy in 2014. It is the world's third largest importer of oil and coal, and the number one importer of liquefied natural gas.
In 2016, its gas bill was $28.9 billion. :snippity:

Worldwide there are up to 2,800 trillion cubic meters of methane-bearing gas hydrates -- a frozen mixture of water and natural methane -- according to the United States Energy Information Administration.Vast reservoirs of this resource are found where high pressures and low temperatures combine -- i.e. buried inside thick Arctic permafrost and under deep ocean floors.Possibly the planet's last great source of carbon-based fuel, gas hydrates are
thought to contain more energy than all the world's other fossil fuels combined.

So far though, no one is close to being able to extract it commercially.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1115

Post by Foggy » Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:18 pm

In Japan you gotta look out for flammable beer. :eek2:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1116

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:01 pm

Foggy wrote:
Wed Nov 01, 2017 6:18 pm
In Japan you gotta look out for flammable beer. :eek2:
At least the fireballs were coming out of his mouth....


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1117

Post by RTH10260 » Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:43 pm

Creationists are ecstatic that science capitulates...
THE UNIVERSE SHOULD NOT ACTUALLY EXIST, CERN SCIENTISTS DISCOVER
BY HANNAH OSBORNE ON 10/25/17 AT 9:11 AM

The universe as we know it should not exist, scientists working at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, have said.

After performing the most precise experiments on antiprotons that have ever been carried out, researchers have discovered a symmetry in nature that they say just shouldn’t be possible.

One of the big questions about the universe is how the first matter formed after the Big Bang. Because particles and antiparticles annihilate one another when they come into contact, if there were exactly equal measures of both, the universe wouldn’t exist—at least not in the form we see it today. As such, there must be an imbalance between particles and antiparticles, even if it is only by the tiniest fraction.

But this is not the case. All experiments designed to find this asymmetry have come up blank. This is also true of the latest, which were recently carried out at CERN by an international team of researchers. The findings from the BASE (Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment) are published in the journal Nature.

http://www.newsweek.com/universe-should ... ver-692500



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1118

Post by Foggy » Sat Nov 11, 2017 5:48 am

The people at the top levels who let this happen will probably get away with it. If anyone is in trouble, it will be the little guys, the street level matter dealers and their customers. Sad! Weak!


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1119

Post by Sluffy1 » Sat Nov 11, 2017 6:15 am

The name Oumuamua (Hawaiian - first to reach out) has been given to the object from "Beyond" that will never return.... Aloha.
And now there's even more exciting news: Astronomers think they know where 'Oumuamua came from. They figured that out by tracing its path backward along the observations that have been made so far and accounting for the wiggles that would have been caused by the gravitational tug of the large objects it flew past.
That led a trio of scientists to consider a neighborhood near the Carina and Columba constellations in the southern sky. There, somewhere in a cluster of stars, 'Oumuamua was born in a disk of pre-planetary dust, close enough to its star to be more rock than ice—until 40 million years ago. Then, something dramatic (they think a nearby planet had something to do with it) abruptly booted it out of the area, sending it on its odyssey to Earth.
http://www.newsweek.com/first-visitor-o ... gin-707457



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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1120

Post by Tiredretiredlawyer » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:43 am

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/201 ... ium=social
Arkansas Moves to Ban Monsanto’s Blockbuster Herbicide
Defying a lawsuit from the seed and pesticide giant, Arkansas put its foot down.


The farm-country showdown over an herbicide called dicamba, used on a genetically engineered seeds product marketed by Monsanto, just heated up. At a public meeting on Wednesday, the Arkansas State Plant Board voted by a vote of 10 to 3 to ban most applications of the weedkiller between April 16 and October 31. Scott Partridge, Monsanto’s vice president of global strategy, attended the meeting and gave a presentation defending the herbicide.

Arkansas acted because dicamba has a tendency to volatilize—that is, after it has been applied, it’s prone to convert into a gas be carried from its intended site, potentially harming vegetation that gets in its path. The volatility problem increases as temperatures rise, hence the ban on use during warm months.

In response to the problem, Monsanto, as well as rival agrichemical giants BASF and DuPont, brought out “low-volatility” dicamba formulations, but this past growing season—the new seeds’ first year in widespread use—saw an explosion of complaints throughout the soybean belt of off-target damage. The Environmental Protection Agency reports 3.6 million acres of non-resistant soybeans alone were damaged by dicamba this year, as well as untold acres of tomatoes, watermelon, cantaloupe, vineyards, pumpkins, vegetables, tobacco, residential gardens, trees, and shrubs.

Meanwhile, the EPA is considering its own ban on dicamba after the 2018 growing season if the off-target damage problems continues. :shock: The agency’s approval of Monsanto’s and other companies so-called low-volatility formulations “automatically expire on November 9, 2018, unless EPA determines before that date that off-site incidents are not occurring at unacceptable frequencies or levels,” an agency spokesperson wrote in an email.


“I’ve been hooked since my first smell of C-4.” Linda Cox, first female Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Technician, first to lead her own unit, go to war, be awarded a Bronze Star, and hold the highest enlisted rank of chief master sergeant.

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1121

Post by RTH10260 » Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:49 am

Boston Dynamics roboter guy has his daily workout




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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1122

Post by Slartibartfast » Sat Nov 18, 2017 3:40 pm

RTH10260 wrote:
Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:43 pm
Creationists are ecstatic that science capitulates...
THE UNIVERSE SHOULD NOT ACTUALLY EXIST, CERN SCIENTISTS DISCOVER
BY HANNAH OSBORNE ON 10/25/17 AT 9:11 AM

The universe as we know it should not exist, scientists working at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, have said.

After performing the most precise experiments on antiprotons that have ever been carried out, researchers have discovered a symmetry in nature that they say just shouldn’t be possible.

One of the big questions about the universe is how the first matter formed after the Big Bang. Because particles and antiparticles annihilate one another when they come into contact, if there were exactly equal measures of both, the universe wouldn’t exist—at least not in the form we see it today. As such, there must be an imbalance between particles and antiparticles, even if it is only by the tiniest fraction.

But this is not the case. All experiments designed to find this asymmetry have come up blank. This is also true of the latest, which were recently carried out at CERN by an international team of researchers. The findings from the BASE (Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment) are published in the journal Nature.

http://www.newsweek.com/universe-should ... ver-692500
Sometimes I think that laymen should not be allowed to write headlines for scientific stories.

*sigh*

When your experiments "come up blank", that suggests that your underlying theory (in this case, the Big Bang cosmology) is wrong. For any true scientist, finding out your are wrong is exciting -- it means you are about to learn something. Instead of presenting the failure to find anti-symmetry as something that advances our understanding of the universe -- the epitome of scientific progress -- it's being played as exactly the opposite. All to bolster a tired old theory that has too many parallels to the way epicycles were used to prop up the geocentric model of the solar system for my taste.

To be clear, I think the experimentalists at CERN have done a great job -- they came up with an extremely sensitive test of a necessary condition for the Big Bang cosmology. They found no sign of it. That means one of only a few things:
  • The experiment was flawed - the odds of this are vanishingly small.
  • The experiment wasn't sensitive enough to detect the asymmetry - which means that the asymmetry is smaller than the Big Bang predicts* (falsifying the current model) or the model doesn't predict the degree of asymmetry (meaning the testable hypothesis of the model is essentially useless).

    * Otherwise it would have predicted that this experiment would find nothing.
  • There is no asymmetry - Which would mean that the Big Bang theory is wrong.
In other words, this result is extremely powerful evidence that the Big Bang never happened. Which is an extraordinarily strong scientific position to take against creationists, in my opinion.

This goes for everyone about everything and is literally and unequivocally true in science:

When you are certain you are right, it is certain that you are wrong.


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nam-myoho-renge-kyo---Thomas Jefferson (quoting Slartibartfast)

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1123

Post by RVInit » Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:12 pm



"I know that human being and fish can coexist peacefully"
--- George W Bush

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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1124

Post by Foggy » Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:32 pm

I think the word "cool" may be a relative term there ... :think:


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Re: Science, General Stuff

#1125

Post by RTH10260 » Mon Nov 20, 2017 10:58 pm

Foggy wrote:
Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:32 pm
I think the word "cool" may be a relative term there ... :think:
Never forget to bring a yuuge bbq steak along on your interstellar travels ;)



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