Homeless Vets Housing

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Addie
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Homeless Vets Housing

#1

Post by Addie » Sat Oct 17, 2015 8:18 am

Long Beach Press Telegram
‘I made it home:’ Homeless vets celebrate new Harbor Gateway apartments

A congresswoman, philanthropic-minded developers and investors all lined up to speak Thursday at the grand opening celebration of the Vermont Villas in Harbor Gateway.

But it was Army veteran Jimmie Lee Anderson, who spent years living on Los Angeles’ infamous Skid Row fighting addiction issues, who got the heartfelt standing ovation.

“I’m 56 years old and I’ve done a lot of crazy things in my life,” Anderson told the crowd of dignitaries that gathered for the unveiling of the 79-unit apartment building for homeless vets. “The first time I slept in a bed, it was like new to me. ... Now I can be a father to the daughter I get to see now.”

Anderson is among the 68 residents who are fast filling the new apartments at 16304 S. Vermont Ave. The four-story project, costing $22 million and taking 2 1/2 years to plan and build, was an ambitious collaboration with Affirmed Housing and PATH Ventures taking the lead.


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optimusprime
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#2

Post by optimusprime » Sun Nov 01, 2015 4:14 pm

:dance:



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Addie
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#3

Post by Addie » Thu Nov 26, 2015 8:58 am

Mic
How the Obama Administration Got 50% of Homeless Veterans Off the Streets in 4 Years ...

The most striking long-term plunge, though, has occurred among one specific segment of the homeless population: veterans. Homelessness among veterans declined by 35%, and over a shorter span of time — between 2009 and 2015. The number of unsheltered homeless veterans across the nation has plummeted by 50% in the past four years.

This progress is the result of unprecedented attention from policymakers. Bipartisan support for smart policy in Congress and extraordinary coordination between the federal government and state and local governments has produced some shocking news in the past year. Earlier in November, Virginia became the first state in the nation to functionally end veteran homelessness altogether.

One of the key policymakers shaping the federal government's role in this effort is Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julian Castro. Formerly the mayor of San Antonio, Castro was tapped by President Barack Obama to become HUD secretary in 2014. Widely considered a rising star in Democratic politics, Castro is often mentioned as a potential running mate for Hillary Clinton.

Mic spoke with Castro about how, in an era of flat wages and rising rent, the country has been able to ensure promising progress for a population that often suffers from the toughest chronic problems.


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Addie
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#4

Post by Addie » Sun Nov 29, 2015 6:56 am

This poor guy's a homeless vet ... now.

Associated Press
Town demolishes veteran's house while he has surgery

WEST HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) — When a U.S. Navy veteran traveled from Long Island to Florida for a knee replacement, his house was the last thing on his mind. But now his memory of it is all he can think about.

Philip Williams' home was demolished in the spring by town officials while he spent about six months recuperating from surgical complications in Fort Lauderdale. Back in New York, officials in the Town of Hempstead deemed his modest two-story home unfit for habitation and knocked it down.

The 69-year-old has now waged a legal battle against the suburban New York town. He wants reimbursement — for the house and all the belongings inside.

"I'm angry and I'm upset. It's just wrong on so many levels," he said "My mortgage was up to date, my property taxes were up to date ... everything was current and fine."


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Foggy
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#5

Post by Foggy » Sun Nov 29, 2015 7:02 am

My mortgage was up to date ...
As they say on Wonkette, WHOA IF TRUE, because that means the bank's property was destroyed, in theory without notice to the bank. It says elsewhere in the linked story that the city sent notices to four banks, but he has no idea why they chose those banks, because he doesn't have accounts at any of them. I assume that since the owner (mortagor) of the property didn't object, it wasn't notified. A pretty mess, eh what?
Edit: But the moral of the story is, tell somebody to keep an eye on your house while you're gone. He says he'd lived there since he was 6 months old, and he's 69 today. Didn't he have any friends among the neighbors? Didn't he tell anyone where he was going?


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TollandRCR
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#6

Post by TollandRCR » Sun Nov 29, 2015 2:29 pm

I just returned from a wonderful week in Seattle with my younger son from San Francisco and my friend from coastal Oregon. A city that I could come to love.

Just as my son reports from San Francisco, downtown Seattle (not just near the Pike Place Market) has many people who present themselves as homeless. I know that for a few this is a scam. I also know that for some or many the core issue is unaddressed mental illness. I have no idea how many of the homeless that I saw are veterans. I also have no real idea of how seriously Seattle has addressed its problem of homelessness.

Despite those caveats, I will say that I saw more people on the streets there than I have ever seen in any European city. On our way back from the oldest Japanese restaurant in Seattle (107, minus the shameful years the owners spent in a concentration camp), we passed under a bridge that was jammed with tiny pup tents. On a given night, nearly 600,000 people are homeless in America. (The State of Homelessness in America 2015) Some are homeless for only that one night; they are often young men who have been cast out of their household. Others are homeless and on the streets because they fear the shelters. For others, there is no apparent alternative. Substance abuse keeps many people out of shelters.

Obama's progress is gratifying. Let's finish the job with veterans and begin anew with the many others on the streets.


“The truth is, we know so little about life, we don’t really know what the good news is and what the bad news is.” Kurt Vonnegut

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esseff44
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#7

Post by esseff44 » Sun Nov 29, 2015 3:53 pm

http://www.swords-to-plowshares.org/201 ... francisco/

It seems that there are more people living and camping in the streets, doorways and bushes than ever before. There are a lot more people sleeping in vehicles than before even though it is illegal and they get hassled. A lot more people have simply fallen through the ever bigger holes in the safety net. A lot of them are people who are not substance abusers and have low paying jobs. But low paying jobs do not pay enough to keep them housed. The situation has started to look permanent People who are under 40 will not be able to remember a time when there was not a homeless problem.



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Addie
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Re: Homeless Vets Housing

#8

Post by Addie » Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:24 pm

New York Mag
After Backlash, VA Won’t Scrap Program to House Homeless Veterans

Outrage from veterans’ affairs groups and a bipartisan group of U.S. senators has the Department of Veterans Affairs backtracking on plans to reallocate $460 million currently used to house homeless veterans.

Under the threatened program, known as HUD-VASH, the Department of Housing and Urban Development provides vouchers to the most vulnerable homeless veterans, while the VA assists with case management. The Trump administration proposed reallocating the money and sending it to local VA hospitals, where officials would be required to spend it on reducing homelessness.

“While some may think Washington bureaucrats are more qualified to make decisions about local VA issues than local VA leaders, we wholeheartedly disagree,” VA spokesman Curt Cashour told the Washington Post.

But the plan inspired a backlash. Politico reports that “anger exploded” during a phone call with the VA and advocacy groups, who were arguing against the move. “There was a big effort to end homelessness, and this indicates we as a nation are taking our foot off the gas pedal,” Leon Winstone, whose group Swords to Plowshares works with Bay Area veterans, told the Post. Advocates said they were concerned about removing experienced caseworkers from the program and worried that local VA officials wouldn’t allocate all the money to fighting homelessness.


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