Jobs

Judge Roy Bean
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Joined: Mon Aug 15, 2016 12:26 pm

Re: Jobs

#451

Post by Judge Roy Bean » Wed Jan 31, 2018 1:12 pm

DejaMoo wrote:
Wed Jan 24, 2018 4:39 pm
:snippity:
I switched to Costco's Kirkland brand, which is still sturdy enough to be usable. They discount Kleenex brand all the time, making them cheaper than the Kirkland brand, but Kirkland's higher quality justifies the higher price.
:yeah:



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AndyinPA
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Location: Pittsburgh PA

Re: Jobs

#452

Post by AndyinPA » Wed Jan 31, 2018 2:33 pm

Volkonski wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 11:03 am
So, taking the last 3 posts together, manufacturing jobs are declining whilst service jobs are increasing. :?
I'm not even sure about the service jobs. Walmart, Sam's Club, Macy's, Target are all closing stores, too. And a chunk of service jobs will be replaced over the coming years by robots. I forget which fast food joint owner recently said that if they keep raising the minimum wage, he would replace people with robots.

And in spite of the 500 coal jobs that I've seen were recently added, I know of at least two mines in this area that have closed or are closing in the coming months that laid off more than those 500 people.



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Chilidog
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Re: Jobs

#453

Post by Chilidog » Wed Jan 31, 2018 2:51 pm

Tiredretiredlawyer wrote:
Thu Jan 11, 2018 2:25 pm
This was quite telling also:
Elliott went on, “It was an easy vote for me. Not just because of ‘The Apprentice.’ We believed in him here at Carrier. The vast majority of us. It was Trump deluxe in there. I told people, ‘He’s gonna find a cause somewhere. He’s gonna be a savior.’ Little did I know the cause was gonna be us."
There's a sucker born every minute



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Chilidog
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Re: Jobs

#454

Post by Chilidog » Wed Jan 31, 2018 2:58 pm

My wife works for a diet food/weight loss program company (not Oprah's).

They can't get anyone to work for them.

They are desperate for applicants that can pass a background check, wear clean, buisness casual clothes and work part time hours.



NMgirl
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Joined: Wed Apr 13, 2016 12:02 am

Re: Jobs

#455

Post by NMgirl » Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:15 pm

Chilidog wrote:
Wed Jan 31, 2018 2:58 pm
My wife works for a diet food/weight loss program company (not Oprah's).

They can't get anyone to work for them.

They are desperate for applicants that can pass a background check, wear clean, buisness casual clothes and work part time hours.
Here's a thought: Offer decent wages and benefits and qualified people will apply.



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Chilidog
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Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 11:36 am

Re: Jobs

#456

Post by Chilidog » Wed Jan 31, 2018 3:35 pm

It's an easy part time job. The wages are not that bad, and they do give out bonuses if you beat your quota.


It's actually an excellent job for an empty nester.


The problem is that it is essentially a sales position. No one wants to do that anymore.



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DejaMoo
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Re: Jobs

#457

Post by DejaMoo » Wed Jan 31, 2018 7:49 pm

Just gonna drop this here...






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Addie
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Re: Jobs

#458

Post by Addie » Wed Feb 07, 2018 11:09 am

The Atlantic
In Trump's First Year, the U.S. Lost Almost 10,000 Solar Jobs

Since the end of the Great Recession, two things have been true of the American solar industry: It was growing like gangbusters, and basically everyone liked it.

From 2010 to 2016, the number of solar jobs in the United States nearly tripled, roaring from about 93,000 to more than 260,000. In 2016 alone, the solar industry grew 17 times faster than the U.S. economy. By the end of that year, there weren’t only more solar workers than coal miners; there were more people working in the solar industry than were employed by every oil, gas, and coal-burning power plant put together.

What’s more, Americans of all stripes thought the technology was pretty good. In 2016, almost 90 percent of Americans told the Pew Research Center that they supported building solar, more than endorsed any other energy source. These results even held in similar polls in deep-red Tennessee.

Well, that was nice while it lasted. In his State of the Union address last week, the only energy source that President Trump mentioned was “beautiful, clean coal,” ending a 14-year streak of presidential lip service for renewables. And while there’s no sign that public support for solar has eroded, the industry’s run of unbroken, year-over-year growth has come to a close as well.

The U.S. solar industry lost about 9,800 jobs in 2017, ending a seven-year streak of nonstop growth and reducing its size to about 250,000 people, according to a new census from the nonpartisan Solar Foundation released Wednesday.


¡Qué vergüenza!

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RTH10260
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Re: Jobs

#459

Post by RTH10260 » Tue Feb 13, 2018 9:57 am

Looking back

1960: "Harvest of Shame"
We used to own our slaves; now we just rent them."
This scene is not taking place in the Congo. It has nothing to do with Johannesburg or Cape Town. It is not Nyasaland or Nigeria. This is Florida. These are citizens of the United States, 1960. This is a shape-up for migrant workers.



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Addie
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Location: downstairs

Re: Jobs

#460

Post by Addie » Wed Feb 14, 2018 2:42 pm

The Guardian
Robots are the ultimate job stealers. Blame them, not immigrants

All across America, one hears the story of the weary white, male worker waiting in line for the American dream. This worker sees the federal government giving special help to people he perceives as line-cutters. Some who benefit from this help are citizens (black people, women, public-sector workers), and others are not (immigrants, refugees, recipients of American foreign aid).

We can well understand the worn patience of the one waiting in line, because in truth, for most middle- and lower-income Americans, the line has stalled or moved back. For the most part, though, the real line-cutters are not people one can blame or politicians can thunder against. That’s because they’re not people. They’re robots.

Nothing is changing the face of American industry faster than automation, and nowhere is that change more stark than in the cornerstone of Louisiana’s industrial wealth: oil.

According to a 2017 Bloomberg report, Nabors Industries, the world’s largest onshore driller, expects to cut the average number of workers at each oil well site from 20 to five. “To me, it’s not just about automating the rig, it’s about automating everything upstream of the rig,” said BP’s head of upstream technology.


¡Qué vergüenza!

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tek
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Re: Jobs

#461

Post by tek » Mon Feb 19, 2018 7:25 am

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listen to the tide slowly turning

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