The Rent Is Too Damn High

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Addie
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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#76

Post by Addie » Thu Jun 22, 2017 4:36 pm

HuffPo
The Hourly Income You Need To Afford Rent Around The U.S.

Full-time workers who make minimum wage can’t afford a two-bedroom rental home in any state in the U.S. without spending more than the recommended 30 percent of their income, according to a report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

The group’s annual “Out of Reach” report compares minimum wages and housing costs in states, metropolitan areas and counties across the country. This year’s results show the hourly wage rate needed for a “modest” two-bedroom rental is more than double the federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour in all but four states.



Arkansas has the lowest hourly income needed for a two-bedroom rental at $13.72, and the state minimum wage is $8.50, the report said. Hawaii demands the highest income of renters: Workers need to make $35.20 to rent a two-bedroom there, and the state minimum wage is just $9.25.

At federal minimum wage, the average American worker would need to log 117-hour weeks for 52 weeks per year to afford a two-bedroom apartment or rental home, according to the report. For the overwhelming majority, not even sharing a dual income with a federal minimum wage-earning partner would cover a two-bedroom rental in their state.


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#77

Post by Addie » Thu Jun 29, 2017 1:25 pm

The Guardian
Low-income workers who live in RVs are being 'chased out' of Silicon Valley streets ...

Amid complaints from residents, Palo Alto has announced it will enforce a rule that bans vehicles from parking in the same spot for longer than 72 hours. The RV dwellers must accede – they have few other options. Silicon Valley was recently ranked the second most inaccessible region in the country for low-income workers trying to find a place to live. Palo Alto’s minimum wage is $12 an hour, but someone would have to earn $42.69 an hour to rent a two-bedroom apartment while having enough left over for other necessities. ...

Mike Becker, 52, said he arrived in the Bay Area at the age of 20 and began living in the vehicle a few years ago after his rent was raised and he lost a carpentry job. The RV was free on Craigslist and makes sense because if he rented a home, “I wouldn’t have enough to pay for food”. He added, “I’m stigmatized with the rest of the RVers. I get the sense they think we’re dirtbags.”

Nicholas Newbury, 35, emerged from a beaten-up trailer with a tarp tied roughly over the top for privacy and protection from the weather. “I’m not upset about it,” he said of the city’s plan, “but at same time, where else do they want us to go?” (He only sleeps occasionally in the trailer, which is not his; at nights he searches the trash on Stanford’s campus looking for cans to sell to recyclers.)

RV dwellers are often local, said Brian Greenberg of LifeMoves, an organization that helps homeless people move into housing. “There’s this myth that we attract people from all over the place, and it really is a myth. Most of the people are what I’d say are our people – they graduated from local high schools on the peninsula, in Silicon Valley. People aren’t as mobile as one would think.”


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#78

Post by Addie » Sat Jul 29, 2017 11:21 am

NYRB: Tenants Under Siege: Inside New York City’s Housing Crisis


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Re: The Rent Is Too Damn High

#79

Post by Addie » Tue Nov 14, 2017 9:42 am

Associated Press
‘We still need to eat’: Tech boom creates working homeless

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — In the same affluent, suburban city where Google built its headquarters, Tes Saldana lives in a crowded but tidy camper she parks on the street.

She concedes it’s “not a very nice living situation,” but it also is not unusual. Until authorities told them to move, more than a dozen other RVs filled with people who can’t afford rent joined Saldana on a tree-lined street in Mountain View, parked between a Target and a luxury apartment complex.

Homeless advocates and city officials say it’s outrageous that in the shadow of a booming tech economy - where young millionaires dine on $15 wood-grilled avocado and think nothing of paying $1,000 for an iPhone X - thousands of families can’t afford a home. Many of the homeless work regular jobs, in some cases serving the very people whose sky-high net worth is the reason housing has become unaffordable for so many.

Across the street from Saldana’s camper, for example, two-bedroom units in the apartment complex start at $3,840, including concierge service. That’s more than she brings home, even in a good month.


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